Place the hedge plant in the hole making sure that it's not planted any deeper than the original depth. As long as soil doesn’t have too much clay and there’s a good amount of drainage, the plants should thrive. Before planting, prepare the site by digging over … Mark out the estimated spread of roots, adding an extra 30-60cm (1-2ft). Although deciduous, it usually holds onto the dead leaves when grown as a hedge, so still offers privacy and shelter during winter. One of the most popular types of hedging planted in the UK, a beech hedge can last for hundreds of years. Then, using a garden line to keep the planting straight, cut slits across the fabric a little longer than your spade is wide. You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website. If you aren’t able to plant your entire hedge within a short period of time, such as a day or weekend, consider potted plants. When planting as a hedge, get an advance on your hedge's eventual height by planting atop a low mound three or four feet wide and six or eight inches high at the center, where the line of beeches would be planted. Weigh them down with rocks and other heavy objects. The American hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana) is sometimes called blue beech, but it is an unrelated species of small tree or shrub. If you are establishing the fence … Mypex is very strong indeed and will not tear and you will find that it is firmly tucked into the slit made by the spade. wikiHow is where trusted research and expert knowledge come together. Step 1 - Collect Beech Tree Seeds. Common Beech hedges (Fagus sylvatica) description Beech (Fagus sylvatica) hedging offer a bright and beautiful display of green hues throughout spring and summer, with the medium-sized leaves adopting warm autumn colours and crisping during the colder months. wikiHow is a “wiki,” similar to Wikipedia, which means that many of our articles are co-written by multiple authors. No matter the size, beech hedging can be easy to plant, maintain and care for. beech hedging plants and are for those who prefer words. Fast-growing, it’s perfect for small spaces as you can simply erect a frame for it to climb up and clip it as tightly as you see fit. If you’re planting in a single line, aim for 4 plants per meter. If you need the hedge to be stock proof you would need to plant in a double row. A Beech hedge can last hundreds of years so it is important that you prepare the site thoroughly before planting. Firm the soil gently around and between the roots as you go to remove air pockets until the soil is at the level of the "tide mark". I have planted 6 beech hedge trees this spring in 2 planters. In year 1 in particular, if there is a dry week PLEASE WATER YOUR HEDGE. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. In this video I plant a bare-root beech hedge in my garden. Backfill around the roots with the soil you removed from the trench. Beech is the most popular deciduous, formal hedge grown in this country. Bark is not designed to be submerged under soil and rots quite easily if you do so. We also use cookies to enable you to buy products from us online in a convenient and secure manner. The second person takes a sapling out of the Rootgrow mixture (keep them in a bucket of water if you are not using Rootgrow) and holds it just above the ground with the roots over and along the line of the slot. To help with any other questions regarding general Beech Hedge planting practices, we have produced a handy guide which you can find here: How To Plant A Hedge page. If for some reason a root has been damaged cut it off with sharp secateurs and dispose of it elsewhere. This will encourage branching. wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. The only thing you should really avoid when picking out a spot to plant your hedge is soil that has a lot of clay in it, or that often gets soggy (be it from a sprinkler or a downward slope that makes water collect in that area). Planting Beech Hedging. We are a mail order plant nursery, specialising in hedging, trees, fruit, roses & shrubs. Alternately, you can use a water-soluble feed purchased at a garden supply store. For the first two years, prune the beech plants by using plant clippers to cut back the longer shoots and cutting off the tips of shorter ones. When planting bare root beech you should first measire the length of hedging required. Once established, it can tolerate dry spells but should be given extra water during drought. Some famous examples include beech hedge plants, hawthorn, hornbeam and privet. Last Updated: November 3, 2020 Do not plant when it is freezing. Call 087 6651 326 tom@landscapeservices.ie. You shouldn’t be able to see any roots above the soil line. Allowed to grow to its full potential, beech forms a large majestic tree for spacious gardens. Beech is very shallow rooted in the first couple of years after planting. We hope these instructions have been useful, but if beech is not for you, don't forget there is wide variety of possibilities so please have a look at the rest of our range of hedging. The perfect time to plant a new hedge is between October and February. Keep bare earth, or mulch or Mypex (covered with bark or gravel if you don't like its look) around your hedge. You could consider using a leaky pipe along the length of the hedge to save you hours of standing there with a hose. Beech hedging grows relatively quickly and one can expect 1-1.5ft (30-45cm) per year after planting. Unfortunately, it is quite common and almost no hedge is fully immune. lifted them with a mini digger without soil and planted them straight away in a trench with water and chicken manure pellets in the bottom. A beech transplanted into a city backyard looks something like Alice in the White Rabbit's house after she ate the growing mushroom. Repeat this process during the first two winters when the plant is dormant and in August of second summer. Powdery mildew on hedge. Its limitation is that it only works with smaller plants (graded at up to 60-80cms). An unheated shed is probably best. This is done using a weed control fabric such as Mypex. We are often asked this question – from a horticultural point of view the very best time to plant almost all Beech hedge plants (especially bare roots and rootballs) is in late Autumn or early Winter. These instructions apply to all sizes of our  beech hedging plants and are for those who prefer words. Excavate to at least 30cm (1ft) and fork over the base and sides. What's up? All Rights Reserved. You can, however, space them a lot closer – if you want an instant hedge. More people standing on it, or two people working face to face with two spades make the job easier, quicker and more fun. References Fresh horse manure can ‘burn’ young saplings so don’t use it immediately before planting. Mulch around the plants and up to 45 cm away from the hedge with well rotted farm manure/compost. Move on 33cm and repeat the process until all are planted. We deliver these plus a range of planting accessories across mainland UK. By using our site, you agree to our. Really well. % of people told us that this article helped them. It will need more water than normal. This article has been viewed 30,665 times. We use cookies to make wikiHow great. To create this article, 10 people, some anonymous, worked to edit and improve it over time. Check that the height of the "tide mark" on the trunk (which shows the soil level where the sapling grew before) is the same height as the surrounding soil. Powdery mildew is a powdery, grey fungal coating that affects a variety of hedging plants, such as native hawthorn hedges. If you have these conditions, Hornbeam (Carpinus betulus) may be a good substitute for beech. In a double row they will still be 33cms in each row however there will be two rows 40 cms apart and the slits in one row will be offset from those in the other row so the two are staggered forcing you to plant in a zig-zag. No matter the size, beech ... Slit Planting. American beeches are less dogmatic about drainage, but there's never a downside to providing it. After planting, your beech hedge should be watered regularly during its first year to give it the best chance of survival and this is especially important if your hedge is being planted in the drier summer months. Try to keep the base of the hedge at about 3 ¼ feet (1 m) at the base, and then thin as you go up to your desired plant height. Instead, standing on the Mypex and using an ordinary garden spade simply drive the spade into the soil, through the Mypex, down for about 2-3". Beech isn’t too fussy about location and will tolerate both sun and partial shade as well as windy locations. Hedge Maple (Acer campestre)—This flowering maple plant is a trendy hedging tree with rapid growth. Always try to cut close to a sprout. This will help the plant to settle into the soil and for the roots and soil to mix and bind together better. There is a bit of an art to this: you neither want to completely compact the soil (especially if you are on heavy soil) or damage the roots by stamping down too hard but equally if the roots are not securely planted in the soil the sapling will move around or be blown over, the roots will come free from the soil and the sapling will struggle or die. Try and find a spot which has well drained soil, as beech trees do not really like pools of … If you beech hedge was well planted it will only need two things in its early years. Avoid keeping them in a heated area such as in your home. In our experience, approaching 100% of the beech failures we replace under guarantee died because they were not watered when the weather was dry. Pick a spot to plant your beech hedge. Determine the Maximum Height of the Green Fence You Want. You can also purchase prepared soil improvers from your local garden supply store. This clipping keep How you plant a hedge will depend on how thick and large you’re hoping for it to grow. Then bring the sapling upright, thereby "sweeping" the roots down into the slot. Do not cut it to width just yet. The layers of newspaper and wood chips will keep light from reaching the weeds that want to grow, effectively suppressing the weeds. Do this all along one edge and then back along the other trying to keep the fabric taut. We know ads can be annoying, but they’re what allow us to make all of wikiHow available for free. The single most important thing is that there is no competition for food or water from other flora (weeds, including grass). They should not curl back on themselves! Young beech saplings of 40-60 or 60-80 cms tall can be slit planted (more later). For pictures, please watch our. Planting Beech Hedges. The trench should be 45-60 cm wide the whole way along the hedge length and a spade's depth. Copyright © 2020 Ashridge Trees Limited. Generally bare root beech is spaced 1ft apart, or 3 per metre. If you have planned ahead and are doing this in advance (gold star if you have! All tip submissions are carefully reviewed before being published. You can order at any time and your plants will be delivered to you at the best time for planting. Having a beech hedge on a property adds incredible value and is a substantial asset. When you need them, take out one bundle at a time, put the plants into your bucket of Rootgrow (or water if you are not using Rootgrow) and take them out one at a time as you plant them. Trimming and shaping happens later. If you intend on … Beech is a long-lived plant used extensively in Europe on estates and other properties. "Planted 20 European beech last summer, and so far they look great. If you use Mypex, you will need less water. It is best planted at 3 plants per metre, one every 33cms, in a single row to allow sufficient room for the roots to establish but equally to be close enough for a tightly knit hedge to grow quickly. If you are doing this all in one go fix a line along the centre line of your trench and then either mark it every 33cms or use a tape measure or marked cane. Place the plant in the hole, checking that the roots can be spread out fully. ), grass and large stones and other detritus from the soil that came out of the trench. You should plant your saplings in late winter or early spring for the best results. Keep in mind that pruning is a process where you are damaging the plant. Pay particular attention to your plant’s water needs if its first summer in your yard is a hot and dry one. For a single row these should be every 33cms. The fabric is just over 100cms wide and you only need a 40+ cms width for a single row of plants (60-70cms for a double row). Planting in a trench involves digging and is hard work. The naturally large European beech (Fagus sylvatica) is well-known as a towering deciduous tree, but it also can be shaped into a stunning hedge. Ivy makes a fantastic, versatile hedge. Please help us continue to provide you with our trusted how-to guides and videos for free by whitelisting wikiHow on your ad blocker. Even though you have soaked your plants prior to planting, you should again water the plants directly after planting. Do this as soon as they are planted. You can expect your beech hedge to grow about 30–60 centimeter (11.8–23.6 in) each year depending on conditions. Next, one person puts the spade through the first slit and drives the blade, vertically, to full depth. However, the condition is actually relatively easy to treat. Hold the plant at about the level it was growing before it was lifted and stamp the ground down around the sapling. A beech tree is best transplanted during the early spring months, when the weather is mild enough to avoid frosts, but not so hot that the plant will dry out. At this point, covering it with weed-proof fabric means you won't have to weed again before planting... Come planting day either keep your plants roots protected from any wind by keeping them in the plastic bags in which they were sent. Remove any weeds (and their roots! Beech Hedging. Also, whichever planting method you use, it is always easier with two or three people. Cut off the top and one side in one winter, leaving the other side for the next winter. I have watered them often; we are now in mid-June and 3 of them have turned brown and crisp. It is a classic, beloved hedge choice and has the added benefit of holding its copper-colored fall leaves on the branches all the … The tree’s leaves change color with the passing seasons, which make it an attractive hedge in many outdoor spaces. They need trench planting. Lay down pieces of newspaper under your hedge. It also makes a fine hedge with bright green leaves that turn burnt orange in autumn. The fabric or cardboard will keep light from reaching the soil, so no weeds will be able to grow in that spot. Don’t remove any more root than is absolutely necessary. How to Plant a Beech Hedge. This will ensure that the soil and climate it will be growing in is best matched for the variety of beech tree. When collecting beech tree seeds, find a healthy beech tree that is growing within a 100 mile radius of where you will be planting the seeds. Push the spade handle forward, then pull it back, making a slot in the ground. Remove the spade. A small beech hedge of 4ft in height will provide a nice demarcation within a garden, but most beech hedges tend to be around 6-7ft in height to give eye level privacy and can be grown taller if required. ), put the soil back into the trench and allow it settle before planting. Overgrown Beech Hedge Plants. I found this information helpful, and I hope for. Larger beech hedging plants - from 80cms upwards have roots that are too big for slit planting and will need to be planted in a trench (more later). Ivy is a fantastic wildlife plant as it provides shelter for nesting birds, autumn flowers for late-flying insects and berries for birds and small mammals in winter. For bare roots, 3 plants per metre is adequate, 5 is good, 7 plants in a double staggered row makes a dense hedge quicker. For a hedge that becomes dense even more quickly, plant a staggered double row of between 5 to 7 plants per meter. European Beech (Fagus sylvatica)—Beech trees are fast-growing deciduous trees that can be clipped into formal hedges. The plants should be planted in a staggered pattern – rather than one straight line. 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