Oxycontin Side Effects

OxyContin (oxycodone) is a opioid pain reliever similar to morphine. An opioid is sometimes called a narcotic.

OxyContin is used to treat moderate to severe pain that is expected to last for an extended period of time. OxyContin is used for around-the-clock treatment of pain.

Do not use OxyContin if you have ever had an allergic reaction to a narcotic medicine (examples include methadone, morphine, Oxycontin, Darvocet, Percocet, Vicodin, Lortab, and many others), or to a narcotic cough medicine that contains codeine, hydrocodone, or dihydrocodeine.

You should also not take OxyContin if you are having an asthma attack or if you have a bowel obstruction called paralytic ileus.

OxyContin may be habit forming and should be used only by the person for whom it was prescribed for. Never share this medicine with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.

To make sure you can safely take OxyContin, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • asthma, COPD, sleep apnea, or other breathing disorders;
  • liver or kidney disease;
  • underactive thyroid;
  • trouble swallowing, or a blockage in your digestive tract (stomach or intestines);
  • curvature of the spine;
  • a history of head injury or brain tumor;
  • epilepsy or other seizure disorder;
  • low blood pressure;
  • gallbladder disease;
  • Addison’s disease or other adrenal gland disorder;
  • enlarged prostate, urination problems;
  • mental illness; or
  • a history of drug or alcohol addiction.

FDA pregnancy category B. OxyContin is not expected to harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. Oxycodone can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are using OxyContin. Older adults may be more likely to have side effects from this medicine.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to OxyContin: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using OxyContin and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • shallow breathing, slow heartbeat;
  • seizure (convulsions);
  • cold, clammy skin;
  • confusion;
  • severe weakness or dizziness; or
  • feeling like you might pass out.

Less serious OxyContin side effects are more likely to occur, such as:

  • nausea, vomiting, constipation, loss of appetite;
  • dizziness, headache, tired feeling;
  • dry mouth;
  • sweating; or
  • itching.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Shares