Lantus Side Effects

Lantus (insulin glargine) is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Lantus is a long-acting form of insulin that is slightly different from other forms of insulin that are not man-made.

Lantus is used to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Do not use Lantus if you are allergic to insulin glargine.

To make sure you can safely take Lantus, tell your doctor if you have liver or kidney disease.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Lantus is harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether insulin glargine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use Lantus without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of allergic reaction to Lantus: itching skin rash over the entire body, wheezing, trouble breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, or feeling like you might pass out.

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of Lantus. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, fainting, or seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar.

Tell your doctor if you have itching, swelling, redness, or thickening of the skin where you inject Lantus.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

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