Thorazine side effects and drug information

Thorazine has many uses and applications as medication. It is often used to treat mental and behavioural problems. It is likewise used to control vomiting and nausea, hiccups, and nervousness before surgery or medical treatment. Moreover, it is used to treat porphyria and together with other drugs to cure tetanus.

Thorazine
ATC codeN05AA01
MetabolismLiver
FormulaC17H19ClN2S
CAS ID50-53-3
Molar mass318.86 g/mol

Overview

Thorazine can cause unwanted and involuntary face or body movements that won’t go away even after you stopped taking the medication. They can cause other hosts of severe side effects. You and your physician must talk about the pros and cons of using this medication. Thorazine is only available with a doctor’s prescription.

Side Effects

Although it can be rare, some individuals have very bad and serious as well as fatal side effects from taking the drug. Inform your medical doctor or seek emergency medical help if you have any of the following symptoms:

  •  Drooling
  • Passing out
  • Dizziness
  • Skin rashes
  • Hives
  • Itchiness
  • Swollen skin
  • Blistered skin
  • Peeling skin
  • Wheezing
  • The tightness of the throat
  • Problems breathing
  • Problems swallowing
  • Swollen mouth
  • Swollen face
  • Swollen lips
  • Swollen tongue
  • Body twitching
  • Change in balance
  • Unable to control body movements
  • Trouble speaking
  • Shakiness
  • Trouble moving around
  • Changes in the way you act
  • Seizures
  • Swollen arms or legs
  • Problems with your eyesight
  • Unexplained bruise and bleeding
  • Problems ejaculating
  • Nippe discharge
  • Enlarged breasts
  • Unable to get an erection
  • Trouble passing urine
  • No menstruation for women
  • Feeling very weak or exhausted
  • Unable to sleep
  • Restlessness
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Abnormal heartbeat
  • Yellowish eyes or skin

Neuroleptic malignant syndrome or NMS can happen. It is very deadly and fatal. Contact your doctor immediately if you ever have any stiffness, muscle cramps, dizziness, fever, bad headache, confusion, irregular heartbeeat, and profuse sweating.

Other people can experience muscle problems such as Tardive Dyskinesia. This problem can occur later on the go away after you stop taking Thorazine. There are cases when it doesn’t go away. The risk is much higher in older adults, particularly older women.

The risk is much higher with more prolonged use of the drug or for higher doses. It can occur after short term use with low doses too. Inform your physician right away when you have problems controlling your bodily movements such as your face, mouth, tongue, jaw, cheeks, chewing, or mouth-puckering.

Dosage and Administration

The dosage and administration of Thorazine can vary from one patient to another, and depending on their health condition, age, reaction to treatment, and more. Here are things to remember:

Patients taking Thorazine orally by mouth

  • Take Thorazine orally with food and a glass full of water or milk to stop stomach problems.
  • If the medicine comes with a dropper, measure each dose and dilute it in 4 ounces of water or fruit juice before taking it.
  • For those with extended-release capsules, each dose must be swallowed as a whole. Do not chew, break, or crush before you swallow the medicine.

Patients using Thorazine as suppository

  • When the suppository is very soft to insert, you can freeze it in the fridge for about thirty minutes and run cold water over it.
  • To use the suppository, remove the foil wrapper, moisten the suppository with cold water. Lie on your side, and insert the suppository up inside the rectum.
  • Never attempt to take more or less of this drug and never take it more or less often than your doctor’s advice.
  • Do not take more than your doctor advised, especially for the elderly, kids, or people with weakened kidney functioning as the medicine is very strong and can cause serious side effects.

The medication Thorazine should be taken for weeks before its effects can be achieved, especially when used to treat emotional and mental conditions. The dosage of this medicine in this particular class can be different from one patient to another and on a case to case basis. Make sure to follow your doctor’s advice and read the directions provided on its label. The information can include only the typical dose for the medication. If the dose you were given is different, never attempt to change it unless the physician tells you to do so.

The level of medication you take will have to depend on the strength of the medicine. There are also several doses you can take each day, the time allowed for each dose, and the length of time you take medicine will have to depend on your medical problem for which you use the medication.

For Chlorpromazine

  • Oral extended-release capsule dosing:
  • Adults – take 30 mg to 300 mg 1 – 3 times a day. Your physician can increase the dosage if needed.
  • Children – This is not recommended for use by kids eight years and younger.

Oral concentration, tablet, or syrup for mental or emotional problems:

  • Adults and teens – 10mg -25mg 2-4 times a day. The doctor can increase the dose later on if needed.
  • Children 6 months to 12 years old – dose is depending on the body weight or size as determined by the doctor. The typical dose is 0.55 mg per kilo of bodyweight — dose for every 4-6 hours.
  • Children 6 months of age – dosing is dependent upon the physician.

For Nausea and Vomiting

  • Adults and teens – 10 mg to 25 mg every 4-6 hours interval.
  • Children 6 months to 12 years old – dose is dependent on body weight and size and must be figured out by the doctor. The dose is 0.55 milligrams per kilo of body weight for every 4-6 hours.
  • Children 6 months old – dosing is dependent upon the physician.

For Sedation Prior Surgery

  • Adults and teens – 25 mg to 50 mg 2-3 hours before surgical treatment.
  • Children 6 mos to 12 years old – dosing is dependent on body size or weight and is determined by the doctor. The usual dose is 0.55 mg per kilo of body weight, 2-3 hours prior to surgery.

For Hiccups Treatment

  • Adults and teens – 25 mg to 50 mg 3-4 times a day. If hiccups persist after 2-3 days of oral treatment, a follow-up treatment by injection can be required.
  • Children – dosing is dependent on the physician.

For Porphyria

  • Adults and teens – 25 mg to 50 mg around 3 – 4 times a day.
  • Children – dosing is dependent upon the physician.

For Nausea and Vomiting

  • Adults and teens – 10 mg to 25 mg every 4-6 hours interval.
  • Children 6 months to 12 years old – dose is dependent on body weight and size and must be figured out by the doctor. The dose is 0.55 milligrams per kilo of body weight for every 4-6 hours.
  • Children 6 months old – dosing is dependent upon the physician.

Drug Interaction

Different medications require different storage requirements. Always read the product label found on the packaging on how to properly store your Thorazine medication. Keep your medicine away from pets and children’s reach at all times. Never flush out your medicines down the toilet or the drain unless when you are told to do so. Follow proper ways of discarding your medication found on the product packaging when no longer in need or when the product expires. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for proper waste disposal.

Warnings and Precautions

Before you take Thorazine, ask your doctor if you may be allergic to it. It can contain certain inactive ingredients that can cause allergic reactions and problems. Ask your pharmacist or doctor for further details.

Before you use Thorazine, ask your doctor about your allergies, inform them of your medical history, like if you have a history of prior appendicitis, a sudden change in bowel movement that went on for weeks, intestinal blocks, or bleeding on your rectum. Before you have surgery, ask your doctor about all the products you may have used, including prescription, OTC drugs, or herbal supplements.

Inform your healthcare provider if you are pregnant before you use Thorazine. Using it for an extended period when pregnant is not recommended. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. It has not been established if Thorazine passes into breast milk. Ask your doctor if you intend to use it while breastfeeding and what effects it may have with your nursing baby.

Overdose and Contraindications

When someone you know has overdosed or has severe symptoms like trouble breathing, passing out, or more, call a doctor or pharmacist for immediate medical assistance. You can also call on the poison control center immediately. Residents from the USA can call on their local poison control center for assistance. Severe symptoms of overdose can include persistent nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain, or cramps.

Never share this medication with another person even if they have symptoms similar to you. The drug has been prescribed for your condition only. Never take any other pain reliever for your urinary tract problem unless you have consulted with your doctor. A different drug  like alendronate may be needed under this circumstance.

Storage

Different medications require different storage requirements. Always read the product label found on the packaging on how to properly store your Thorazine medication. Keep your medication away from pets and children’s reach at all times. Never flush out your medicines down the toilet or the drain unless when you are told to do so. Follow proper ways of discarding your medication found on the product packaging when no longer in need or when the product expires. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for proper waste disposal.

Missed Dose of Thorazine

When your doctor has advised that you take it on a specific schedule and you missed a dose, take it as soon as you can remember. If it is near the time of your next dose, skip the missed dose altogether. Take it the next regular time. Do not attempt to take a double dose to make up for a missed dosage.