DRUGS DOSAGE

A dose is the measured quantity of a drug, pathogen, or nutrient that is delivered as a unit. If the quantity delivered is great, the dose is larger. Doses are typically measured for the compounds in medicine. The term ‘dose’ is typically applied to the quantity of a medicine or other agent that is administered for therapeutic purposes. It is also used to describe a case where a substance is introduced to the body.

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A dose is the measured quantity of a drug, pathogen, or nutrient that is delivered as a unit. If the quantity delivered is great, the dose is larger. Doses are typically measured for the compounds in medicine. The term ‘dose’ is typically applied to the quantity of a medicine or other agent that is administered for therapeutic purposes. It is also used to describe a case where a substance is introduced to the body.

In nutrition, the term applies to how much of a specific nutrient is contained in a person’s diet or in a particular meal, food, or dietary supplement. For viral and bacterial agents, dose refers to the amount of pathogen that is required to infect a host.

A dose is the amount of drug taken at a given one time. This is usually expressed as the weight of the drug, such as 250 mg, 500 mg, etc. It also refers to the volume of drug solution, such as 5 mg, 2 drops, or the number of dosage forms such as 1 tablet, 1 capsule, or 1 suppository, or some other quantity such as 2 puffs.

The dosage regimen refers to the frequency at which the doses of the drug are to be given or administered, such as one tablet twice daily, 25 mg thrice daily, or one injection once weekly.

The dosage form of a eliquis drug is the physical form of a dose. Common dosage forms include capsules, tablets, ointments, creams, aerosols, and patches. Each dosage may have a number of specialized forms such as extended-release, slow-release, chewable, etc. The strength is the amount of drug in the dosage form or a unit of the dosage form, such as 250 mg tablet, 200 mg/5ml suspension, etc.

The route of administration is the manner the dosage is to be given or administered. The common routes of administration of a drug include oral, nasal, topical, rectal, and inhalation.

The optimal dosage of a drug is the dosage that gives the best-desired effect with the minimum of possible side effects.

A dose of any biological or chemical agent has several factors that are critical to its effectiveness, such as concentration, which is the amount of agent being administered to the body at a given time, as well as the duration of exposure. Some drugs have a slow-release feature where portions of the medications are metabolized at different times, which changes the impacts of the active ingredients on the body.

There are several factors to consider when deciding a dose of a drug, including the age of the individual, weight, sex, ethnicity, functions of the liver and the kidney, and if the individual smokes. Other medicines that the individual is currently taking may also affect the dose of the drug he will be given.

Dosage instructions are written on the prescription that a doctor will issue, on the hospital chart, and on the pharmacy label of the prescribed medication. You may also find dosage instructions on the packaging and inserts of medications that are sold over-the-counter.

  • Celebrex
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  • Mobic