Dexilant Side Effects

Healing and maintaining healing of irritation of the esophagus. It is also used to treat symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (eg, heartburn). It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Dexilant delayed-release capsules is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). It works by decreasing the amount of acid produced in the stomach.

Some medical conditions may interact with Dexilant delayed-release capsules. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

  • if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding
  • if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement
  • if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances
  • if you have low blood potassium or magnesium levels, liver problems, or stomach or bowel cancer
  • if you have osteoporosis (weak bones), a family history of osteoporosis, or other risk factors of osteoporosis (eg, smoking, poor nutrition)

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Dexilant delayed-release capsules. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

  • Diuretics (eg, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide) because the risk of low blood magnesium levels may be increased
  • Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin), digoxin, methotrexate, saquinavir, or tacrolimus because the risk of their side effects may be increased by Dexilant delayed-release capsules
  • Ampicillin, atazanavir, bosutinib, clopidogrel, dasatinib, erlotinib, indinavir, iron, itraconazole, ketoconazole, mycophenolate, nelfinavir, nilotinib, posaconazole, rilpivirine, or sorafenib because their effectiveness may be decreased by Dexilant delayed-release capsules

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Dexilant delayed-release capsules may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.

All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome:

Gas; mild diarrhea or stomach pain; nausea; symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection (eg, cough, runny or stuffy nose, sneezing); vomiting.

Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects occur:

Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing; tightness in the chest or throat; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue; unusual hoarseness); bloody or watery stools; bone pain; calf or leg pain, swelling, redness, or tenderness; chest, jaw, or arm pain; depression; fainting; fast, slow, or irregular heartbeat; fever, chills, or sore throat; joint pain, tenderness, swelling, or warmth; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; seizures; severe or persistent diarrhea or stomach pain; severe or persistent nausea or vomiting; shortness of breath; stomach cramps; sudden, severe nausea or vomiting; symptoms of liver problems (eg, dark urine, loss of appetite, pale stools, unusual nausea, yellowing of the skin or eyes); unexplained weight loss; unusual sweating; unusual tiredness or weakness.

This is not a complete list of all side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, contact your health care provider.

 

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