Suboxone Side Effects

March 25th, 2013 by Helen Scholz

Suboxone contains a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Buprenorphine is an opioid medication. An opioid is sometimes called a narcotic.

Naloxone is an special narcotic drug that reverses the effects of other narcotic medicines.

Suboxone is used to treat narcotic (opiate) addiction.

You should not use Suboxone if you are allergic to buprenorphine or naloxone (Narcan).

To make sure Suboxone is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sleep apnea, or other breathing disorder;
  • enlarged prostate, urination problems;
  • liver disease;
  • kidney disease;
  • curvature of the spine that affects breathing;
  • underactive thyroid;
  • gallbladder disease;
  • Addison’s disease (an adrenal gland disorder);
  • a history of mental illness, hallucinations, or psychotic episode;
  • a history of drug or alcohol addiction; or
  • a history of seizures, head injury, or brain tumor.

Buprenorphine may be habit forming. Never share Suboxone with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether Suboxone will harm an unborn baby. Suboxone may cause addiction or withdrawal symptoms in your newborn if you take the medication during pregnancy. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Suboxone: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Like other narcotic medicines, buprenorphine can slow your breathing. Death may occur if breathing becomes too weak.

Call your doctor at once or seek emergency medical attention if you have:

  • extreme drowsiness;
  • loss of coordination, weakness or limp feeling;
  • blurred vision, slurred speech, thinking problems;
  • weak or shallow breathing;
  • nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • pounding heartbeats or fluttering in your chest; or
  • withdrawal symptoms–diarrhea, vomiting, shaking or shivering, runny nose, watery eyes, muscle pain, and feeling very hot or cold.

Common Suboxone side effects may include:

  • headache, mild dizziness;
  • numbness or tingling;
  • drowsiness, or sleep problems (insomnia);
  • stomach pain, vomiting, constipation;
  • redness, pain, or numbness in your mouth;
  • feeling drunk; or
  • trouble concentrating.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.